The (Ridiculously) Amazing Spider-Man 2

(WARNING: The following article contains many spoilers for the Amazing Spider-Man 2)

On May 2 The Amazing Spider-man 2 swung into theaters worldwide. It was number one in the box office on its opening weekend, but has received many harsh reviews. However from the standpoint of the true Spider-man comic book fan this movie did everything it was supposed to do and maybe even more. The movie pieced together multiple Spiderman stories throughout history and blended them extremely well. The character of Spider-Man was portrayed much more like his comic book counterpart than the earlier franchise’s adaptation. The special effects and animation were spectacular to say the least. 

Connecting the stories

Amazing Spider-man 2 tells the story of arguably the most pivotal point in Peter Parker’s life as Spider-man. It tells the story of how his childhood best friend becomes his greatest foe and how Peter causes the death of his true love, the greatest burden he has to bare. To tell this story Marc Webb chose to blend aspects from multiple Spider-man stories from different incarnations of the hero. First Webb blended the story of Harry Osborne with that of Eddie Brock in the “Ultimate Spider-man” comic series. In Webb’s film Harry returns home after being gone for a very long time and reunites with his closest childhood friend Peter, whom his father had been research partners with before Peter’s parent’s death. Like in “Ultimate Spider-man” the rift forms between Harry and Peter when Peter refuses to share their fathers’ research with Harry, parallel to Peter destroying Eddie and his fathers’ research. Harry need their fathers’ research to cure his deadly disease that killed his father before him, but it exists only in Peter’s blood which he refuses to share due to the uncertainties of the effects it could have on Harry. Harry like Eddie finds another way to access the research and this results in them both being turned into monsters. Harry into the Green Goblin and Eddie into Venom in the “Ultimate Spider-Man” series. In both stories then have the friend turned foe hunt down Peter and attempt to exact revenge and then another story is blended in.

Green Goblin and Spider-man face off during the films climax.

Green Goblin and Spider-man face off during the films climax.

The Death of Gwen Stacy is arguably the most pivotal moment in Peter’s history as Spider-Man and it was executed perfectly in the film. Instead of Norman Osborne as the Green Goblin killing Stacy, like in the comics, Webb chose instead to have Harry as the Green Goblin to be the one to deal this traumatizing blow to Peter. This choice is arguably more powerful due to Harry and Peter’s dynamic, his best friend murdering the love of his life. The story reaches its climax in this intense struggles that resolves in a live action representation of one of the most iconic scenes in comic book history, represented nearly identically and just as powerfully. The scene left barely a dry eye in the house, even expecting fans were shaken up by the scene. Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield’s performance sold the scene to everyone. Webb’s execution of the story couldn’t have been any more perfect and true to the comics. He successfully blended the stories and even characters in a way that best delivered the plot of his film.

Gwen gwen-final

 

RELATED LINK: Mto3d.wordpress.com/2014/05/06/review-magazine Lee Daniels’ The Butler review

Illustrating the spider

Spider-man in this film was done right. The witty smart aleck teenage hero from the comics was seen truly for the first time like this on screen though Webb’s franchise. The constant banter of Spider-man was lost in the Raimi films and this is what makes the character the Spider-man fans know and love. He constantly has a rebuttal or remark that lightens every situation and his antics throughout the film are more comic book like than ever before, for example he dresses like a firefighter when fighting Electro for the first time. Andrew Garfield’s portrayal fits the character so much more than Toby Maguire’s. Even further it is finally shown that not every fight Spider-man has is with some take over the world big time villain, a lot of the film shows Spider-man just being Spider-man and this makes it fun to watch. Webb couldn’t have approached the character of Spider-man any better than he did by once again sticking to the source material in the comics.

Andrew Garfield on set.

Andrew Garfield on set.

The Spectacular representation of the Web Head doesn’t end in the way that he acts but literally how he is illustrated visually. 3D animated models were made for most main characters in the film and were seamlessly blended in with the live action shots. The animation for Spidey himself drew from specific iconic illustrations of Spider-man in many different poses which resulting in movement that has so spectacular to watch it was a visual experience on par with, if not better than, actually reading the comics. Webb did a fantastic job of accurately representing the character in every way possible from the way he acts to the way he moves as he web slings through New York. If for nothing else this movie is worth seeing due to its amazing animation blending mocap with actual fabricated animation and I would suggest seeing it for yourself before allowing negative reviews to form your opinion. Go in with an open mind and realize where the material is coming from you’ll likely appreciate what was done and in the least enjoy the experience of seeing  your favorite wall crawler take down the bad guys. “Look out here comes the Spider-Man!”

 

 

Spider-man faces down three of his infamous foes.

Spider-man faces down three of his infamous foes.

 

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